Secure browsing on open Wi-Fi hotspots

I frequently connect to insecure Wi-Fi networks on my iOS devices and my Mac. Aside from the risk of eavesdropping and malware when connecting to these hotspots, they frequently block access to services, insert advertisements in web pages, or worse.

To work around these problems, I’ve tried numerous virtual private network (VPN) services. My experience with most of them has been awful. They tend to connect slowly or not at all, and I frequently can’t access anything on the Internet once the VPN connection is made. Many services don’t offer automatic connections, particularly on iOS. The software tends to be clunky and confusing.

Cloak VPN is an exception. I’ve been using Cloak for several months, and it’s been rock solid. It’s also affordable, at $3/mo for 5GB of data transfer or $10 for unlimited transfer. If you don’t want a subscription, Cloak also offers the ability to buy non-renewing, unlimited passes for a week, a month, or a year.

Cloak automatically detects when you’re connecting to insecure Wi-Fi and protects your connection. One account can be used to protect all your computers and iDevices.

Cloak released version 2.0 today for iOS, which is a significant upgrade. You can now identify trusted networks, such as your home or cellular network, and Cloak will stay out of the way when you use those networks. This means you can set it up and pretty much forget about it. (Cloak for Mac already offers this capability.)

Like any VPN, using Cloak can cause issues. Cloaked connections are sometimes misidentified by servers as coming from a “bot” instead of a human. This isn’t Cloak’s fault, but a consequence of well-intentioned but misguided system administrators. Some sites won’t let you connect at all, while others, such as Wells Fargo, may ask an extra question when you sign in.

With a few clicks or taps, you can disable Cloak and connect to problem sites. In practice, I’ve only found one or two websites that were completely blocked while using Cloak. I’ve also had outgoing iMessages get blocked sporadically. In all, the issues have been minor, and far outweighed by the benefits of the service.

Cloak has very responsive customer service and is sometimes able to work around blocks by re-routing traffic for certain websites.

I highly encourage you to learn more about Cloak and get started with a free 30-day trial. You don’t need to hand over a credit card to get stared.

Cloak provides small data kickbacks to users who tout them on Twitter. I don’t spam my followers so that I can get free stuff. I’m posting this because I rely on Cloak, and I think everyone should check it out.

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